Matthew Butt

Reinvigorating a daily stand-up by walking the board

Posted in programming by bnathyuw on 16 May 2016

I’ve been working with a team who had a problem with focus: when I joined them, they seemed to be busy all the time, but they were frustrated that they weren’t making progress towards their sprint goals.

This situation could be seen in microcosm at the daily stand-up meeting. In this post I’m going to describe how a simple adjustment to this meeting helped us start to improve focus, morale and productivity.

The Scrum Guide gives a template for the daily stand-up meeting (which it calls the Daily Scrum):

The Daily Scrum is held at the same time and place each day to reduce complexity. During the meeting, the Development Team members explain:

  • What did I do yesterday that helped the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
  • What will I do today to help the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
  • Do I see any impediment that prevents me or the Development Team from meeting the Sprint Goal?

My team was indeed practising this technique, but it seemed that they often forgot the discipline of focusing on ‘helping the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal’, and the meeting often descended into yesterday-I-diddery, with each team member recounting all the things they did the day before in trivial detail.

It seems to me that in a stand-up of this format, each team member’s incentive becomes having something to say, rather than showing progress towards the Sprint Goal, and this produces an incentive to be busy, no matter how irrelevant or frankly counterproductive the tasks might be. In this team, I saw a lot of effort spent on support tasks—whether or not the issue was pressing—, a significant amount of aimless ‘refactoring’, which was essentially yak shaving, and a tendency for team members to interrupt each other for help with lower priority work. In effect, everyone starts prioritising busy work, rather than focusing on the team’s goals.

The other consequence of this approach was that the team’s board was a poor representation of our work: people would be working on tasks that weren’t visible on the board, and the stories that were on the board often didn’t move anywhere. The Scrum Master and I tried various approaches to coordinate the board and the stand-up reports, but the focus was still lacking.

I’ve previously worked in a Kanban environment, and the format of a Kanban standup is significantly different:

Standup meetings have evolved differently with Kanban. The need to go around the room and ask the three questions is obviated by the card wall. … The focus is on flow of work. The facilitator … will “walk the board.” The convention has developed work backward—from right to left (in the direction of pull)—through the tickets on the board. The facilitator might solicit a status update on a ticket or simply ask if there is any additional information that is not on the board and may not be known to the team.

(Anderson, David J. Kanban, Successful evolutionary change for your technology business)

I suggested that we try this approach for a week, and see whether it helped give us more focus. As people were concerned that we might lose sight of important work, we agreed that we would walk the board first, and then run quickly round the team to see if anything was missing.

The initial results were encouraging, and several weeks later we are still walking the board, rather than going round the team. In particular, our board now contains a great deal more information on the tasks in play, and the team have got really good at carding up even small tasks so they are visible at the next stand-up. The amount of off-plan and busy work has also dropped, and this also be a result of the focus on the tasks on the board. Perhaps my favourite development is that the tasks on the board have become much smaller: the drive to get things done is now focused on pulling small, focused tasks across the board, rather than doing busy work.

Of course this technique is no cure-all, and it took a while for the team to acquire the discipline of walking the board in order, rather than jumping in to discuss whichever task particularly excites them. However, as an incremental adaptation, I’m very pleased with its results.

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