Matthew Butt

Constructivism Part II

Posted in programming by bnathyuw on 18 February 2010

Following on from yesterday’s work, another experiment today, and this time I chose a real piece of constructivist design to copy:

Image composed of text, semicircular blocks of colour, and diagonally placed squares and strips
The simple lines of this image make it fairly straightforward to lay out in HTML and CSS:

http://playground.matthewbutt.com/why.htm

Here’s how I did it:

My h1 contains the text ‘WHY?’. The h1 is a 200px square absolutely positioned on the page.

To create the semi-circle, I’ve given this element two background gradients: the first uses a linear gradient to draw two blocks of colour on the page: the upper block is solid parchment colour, whilst the lower block is transparent.

In Mozilla this is marked up like this:

-moz-linear-gradient(top, #F1ECD9 100px, rgba(241, 236, 217, 0) 100px)

In Webkit is takes this form:

-webkit-gradient(linear, 0 100, 0 200, from(#F1ECD9), color-stop(0, rgba(241, 236, 217, 0)), to(rgba(241, 236, 217, 0)))

You’ll see that I’ve defined the transparent colour as rgba(241, 236, 217, 0) rather than simply transparent; I found that using simple transparent gave me some ghosting, which is clearly not the intention.

Underneath this gradient is a second background, which this time defines a radial gradient:

-moz-radial-gradient(100px 100px, circle cover, black 100px, #F1ECD9 100px, #F1ECD9 200px)

-webkit-gradient(radial, 100 100, 100, 100 100, 200, from(black), color-stop(0, #F1ECD9), to(#F1ECD9))

In each case, this draws a 100px-radius black circle, followed by an area of parchment colour.

The lipsum content with the inverted red semicircle is coded in a similar way, although I could do away with the linear gradient, as my p tags give me the perfect hooks for a parchment-coloured background without worrying about gradients. The text is shifted down with a simple padding-top rule, and the red line down the side is an equally straightforward border-right.

The large red square doesn’t actually exist: it’s an :after pseudo-element on the body tag, which is then sized, positioned and rotated. I had to give it content(' ') to get it to appear, but otherwise it’s pure smoke and mirrors.

Finally, the three 45° links were interesting to position:

They start off as three li elements arranged normally on the screen:

Three blocks, one above the other, with space between

Next, I rotate the containing ul by 90° widdershins around its top right corner:

Three blocks next to each other with the text running bottom to top

Finally, I rotate each li by 45° clockwise around what was originally its middle-right and is now its top-centre:

Three diagonal blocks next to each other

These are then positioned absolutely on the page.

And that’s my piece of constructivist CSS for the day.

I have one outstanding problem: the edges of my semi-circles are unpleasantly aliased. I’ve tried leaving a small gap between the colour stop points in the gradient to see if that helps, but the effect is pretty unsatisfactory. Any suggestions would be welcome!

Acknowledgments

Fonts

Sites

Tagged with: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: